This is How We Used to Worship God

Discussion in 'Black History Main Forum' started by Mawuli, Jul 19, 2017.

  1. Mawuli

    Mawuli TheGuide Staff Member

    Yeve musical repertoire usually involves at least seven or at most nine dance forms. The major dance forms in the repertoire performed by the Ohio African Ensemble are: Husago, Afovu, Sogba, Sovu, Adavu, and Avlevu.

    ilevi and acuriousblackman like this.
  2. Mawuli

    Mawuli TheGuide Staff Member

    Husago is one of the phases/movements in Yeve ritual performance. Yeve (also known as Xebieso, Hú or Tohono) is the thunder God, a pantheon with historical relations to the Yoruba Shango and Xevioso of Benin. The cult is one of the most "powerful" and most secretive among others that exists in West Africa. Yeve musical repertoire usually involves at least seven or at most nine dance forms.
    ilevi and acuriousblackman like this.
  3. Mawuli

    Mawuli TheGuide Staff Member

    This is a performance of Sovu, which is a sacred piece of music from the Yeve religion. Performed by the Kekeli ensemble of the West African Drum and Dance Ensemble, University of the Philippines College of Music

    ilevi and acuriousblackman like this.
  4. Nanyanika Elikem

    Nanyanika Elikem New Member

    Thanks Mawuli, this is absolutely beautiful.
  5. ilevi

    ilevi Active Member

    Did you know that "Shango" is actually an Alaafin that ruled during the era of "Old EVEO" ? After his death, he was deified and his day of worship came to be on the same day as the God of thunder and lightning of the Yoruba. This is one of the ways how the Yoruba have steadily lost bits and pieces of connections with us. The true name of the supreme being of the Yoruba is Yakuta/Jakuta; The one that throws stones and referred to as the thunderbolt and lightning. Yakuta/Jakuta, Xevieso/Hebioso, and Yeve are indeed all related. The Yeve cult may or may not have survived abroad but, the names certainly have and even some of the drumming styles.

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